Acoma Eyedazzlers by Amanda Lucario

Acoma Eyedazzlers by Amanda Lucario

Amanda Lucario
Pueblo Pottery
4.5 x 4.25 inches (L x W)
Exquisite fine line jars by Amanda Lucario. Measuring 4.25” H x 4” D and 4.5” H x 4.25” D left to right, these two exhibit some of the most precision oriented detail I have ever seen. The designs are incredibly tight and the lines are impeccably straight. You really have to zoom in to appreciate the full effect. Both are available. Free shipping for a limited time. Message us directly or call 1.800.854.1359

Acoma Parrot Olla

Acoma Parrot Olla

Rachel Aragon
Pueblo Pottery
9.5 x 10 inches (L x W)
This incredible Acoma Parrot Olla was made by Rachel Aragon who has long been considered one of the finest potters from her pueblo. It measures 9.5” tall by 10” in diameter and features all the hallmarks for which she has become recognized. It is currently available via Ancient Nations Indigenous Arts. Please feel free to message me with questions or visit our website for more details: www.ancientnations.com. A link is in our profile. Rachel was born in 1938 as a member of the Eagle Clan. She was encouraged and inspired to learn the art of working with clay at the age of 10 from her mother, Lupe Aragon. Lupe shared with Rachel all the fundamentals of hand coiling pottery using ancient traditional methods. She graduated from High School in 1958 and then began pursuing a career in working with clay on a more professional level. Rachel specializes in hand coiled traditional fertility pottery. She gathers her clay from within the Acoma Pueblo. Then, she soaks the clay, grinds the clay, cleans the clay, hand mixes, hand coils, shapes, sands, and hand paints the pottery, using natural pigments which she boils together to produce the natural colors she paints with. Then, she fires her pottery outdoors, with wood chips. Rachel is well known for her light weight pottery and beautiful hand painted designs.

Angel Singer by Maxine Toya (Jemez)

Angel Singer by Maxine Toya (Jemez)

Maxine Toya
Pueblo Pottery
This brand new Angel Singer is the work of Maxine Toya from the Jemez Pueblo. It measures approximately 7-8” high. It has not been added to our website yet, but is currently available. Please feel free to message me for details. I have long been a fan of Maxine’s work, but this is the first angel we’ve ever shown. I had the pleasure of speaking with Maxine recently, and she is a wonderful person who is dedicated to her family and her culture. You can see this in her work. One of my favorite aspects of her figures (and there are many) is the highly polished surfaces. The reds are so rich and warm, providing a nice contrast to the other colors in her palette. This one just “sings” to me.

Bear Fetish Jar & Green Seed Pot with Turquoise Cabochon

Bear Fetish Jar & Green Seed Pot with Turquoise Cabochon

Russell Sanchez
Pueblo Pottery
A pair of early works in clay by Russell Sanchez from San Ildefonso. The small green seed pot with turquoise cabochon on the left is circa 1985 and measures 2.5” H x 2.5” D. The red and black vase with turquoise heishi inlay, featuring a fetish bear lid, is circa 1997 and measures 7.5” H x 4.5” D. I always love when an artist earlier works are made available because it not only illustrates their evolution as an artist, it also creates a unique opportunity for collectors who follow specific artists. Both are immediately available. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Black Avanyu Vase by Linda Tafoya Sanchez.  Reverse Redware Vase by James Ebelacker.

Black Avanyu Vase by Linda Tafoya Sanchez. Reverse Redware Vase by James Ebelacker.

Linda Tafoya Sanchez
Pueblo Pottery
This striking pair of Santa Clara carved Pueblo pottery need a new home. The black vase on the left is by Linda Tafoya Sanchez (measuring approximately 10 1/2” tall by 7 3/4” in diameter), while the red jar on the right is the work of James Ebelacker (measuring approximately 8 1/4” tall by 7 1/4” in diameter). Feel free to message me for details. More information on each piece, as well as the artists who created them, can also be found on our website: www.ancientnations.com. A link is in our profile.

Black and White Vase by Lisa  Holt & Harlan Reano.  Contemporary Hopi Bird Jar by Les Namingha.

Black and White Vase by Lisa Holt & Harlan Reano. Contemporary Hopi Bird Jar by Les Namingha.

Lisa Holt & Harlan Reano
Pueblo Pottery
Black and white vase by Lisa Holt (Cochiti) & Harlan Reano (Kewa). Multi-color abstract jar by Les Namingha (Hopi/Zuni). Classic black and white with orange dots using traditional Cochiti methods and materials featuring floral/germination designs throughout. This piece measures 7.75” H x 6.75” in diameter. It has not yet appeared on our website but is available now. Please message me directly for details. Stylized Sikyatki birds encircle the rim of this contemporary jar made with natural clay and acrylic paints - by Les Namingha. It measures 5.5” tall by 6” in diameter.

Blackfeet Beaded Doll

Blackfeet Beaded Doll

Jackie Bread
Plains Indian Beadwork
23.5 x 8 inches (L x W)
Jackie Larson Bread is a Native American beadwork artist from the Blackfeet Reservation in Browning, Montana. Her interest in bead work was sparked from looking at her late-grandmother's beaded pieces. In awe of these objects, Bread self-taught herself how to bead when she was younger and now, she has been beading for more than 20 years. Continuing through trial and error, Bread has received numerous awards for her beading including the prestigious SWAIA Best of Show a the Santa Fe Indian Market. "I try to place myself in the frame of mind of a nineteenth century artist. Using a limited palette of colors, I strive to produce a beaded piece true to that time period. I use old stock beads or modern re-runs of old colors, to lend a feel of authenticity to each piece." Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details. This piece can also be seen on our website. A link is in our profile.

Blue Bear & Albino Chakwaina - Old Style Katsinam

Blue Bear & Albino Chakwaina - Old Style Katsinam

Dustin Holmes
Hopi Kachina
Brand new Hopi katsina carvings by Dustin Holmes (Na’uy’wyma) from the village of Moenkopi on the western edge of Third Mesa. This Blue Bear (L) and Albino Chakwaina (R) are approximately 10.5” and 11.5” tall respectively. Both available now. Please message us with your inquiry or call direct: 1.800.854.1359 Dustin provided the following info: “My name is Dustin Holmes. I am member of the Hopi tribe. I am born for the Badger/Butterfly clan. I am initiated to the Masaaw clan. I came into carving mostly through self teaching. I picked up the traditional old style carving technique as a carving style that I came to love. I began carving around the age of 12, and have continued to carve since. I have a God brother by the name of Makwesa Tsimoga who I have looked up to. Brian and Emery Holmes Jr. are carvers who are relatives of mine. I know other artists such as Raynard Lalo, Bendrew Atokuku, Max Curley, Arthur Holmes Jr. and other artists out there who I look to as mentors.”

Bluejays and Hummingbirds by Johnathan Naranjo

Bluejays and Hummingbirds by Johnathan Naranjo

Johnathan Naranjo
Pueblo Pottery
Totally in love with this new vase by Johnathan Naranjo. Depicting a pair of Blue jays, this finely sgraffito carved vessel measures 8” tall and 5.5” in diameter. The charming Hummingbird vase measures 5 inches tall by 5 1/4 inches in diameter. Born into Santa Clara Pueblo in 1987, Johnathan Naranjo is the nephew of Dusty Naranjo, and the grandson of Bernice Naranjo. He is one of the next generation of potters bridging the gap between ancient traditions and contemporary life. He began working with clay early in life and developed his own distinctive style. Johnathan has also developed a keen sense as to when to pull something from the fire in order to get a dark brown product rather than the usual black. Then he uses his sgraffito tools to add a mix of contemporary and traditional designs. Because of his firing process, he can get varying colors in his sgraffito work depending on the depth of the scratch. In 2013 Johnathan won the Tony Da Award at the Santa Fe Indian Market for his intricate and innovative style of pottery. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Butterfly Dancers by Marcellus and Elizabeth Medina.  Contemporary Butterflies by Jennifer Tafoya.

Butterfly Dancers by Marcellus and Elizabeth Medina. Contemporary Butterflies by Jennifer Tafoya.

Marcellus & Elizabeth Medina
Pueblo Pottery
Left: butterfly dancers and hand-painted butterflies, by Elizabeth and Marcellus Medina (Zia). Right: award-winning sgraffito designed butterflies by Jennifer Tafoya (Santa Clara). This incredible contemporary butterfly design is by Jennifer Tafoya of Santa Clara Pueblo. Jennifer is the daughter of Ray Tafoya. She has won made top awards at the most prestigious art shows and appears in major museums and pottery collections throughout the country and around the world. One close look at a piece like this, and it’s easy to see why! Measuring approximately 2.25” tall by 4” wide, this piece is available through the gallery.

Chocolate Seed Pot with Bull Elk

Chocolate Seed Pot with Bull Elk

Kevin Naranjo
Pueblo Pottery
2.5 x 4 inches (L x W)
This meticulously detailed sgraffito work is the creation of Kevin Naranjo from Santa Clara Pueblo. It measures 2.5” tall and 4” in diameter - featuring bull elk on opposing sides. Kevin is an avid outdoors-man who enjoys incorporating wildlife scenes into his pottery. He knows it won’t be long before these two are bugling across the valley and competing for a mate. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Corn Maidens #10 - Tile

Corn Maidens #10 - Tile

Jason Garcia
Pueblo Pottery
8.25 x 13 inches (L x W)
This award-winning tile, “Corn Maidens,” is the work of Jason Garcia from Santa Clara Pueblo. It measures 8.25” tall and 13” long. Jason is the son of noted potters Gloria Garcia (Goldenrod) and John Garcia. His early ceramics work focused primarily on figures and capturing Pueblo dances and activities in clay. “I learned by watching and learning from my parents and other family members, including my aunts and grandmothers.” His work on tile, creating “two dimensional images on a three dimensional surface, was inspired by the late Pablita Velarde’s mineral paintings on masonite.” As he was also interested in photography and drawing, the figures were certainly a way of giving form to his vision of the world around him. A few years ago, he began making clay tiles on which he painted Pueblo dancers and dances in the traditional two-dimensional painting style of Santa Clara. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.
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Crow Mother Kachina

Crow Mother Kachina

Kevin Pochoema
Hopi Kachina
12 x 4 inches (L x W)
This exquisite Crow Mother kachina is the work of award-winning Hopi carver, Kevin Pochoema. Kevin is well known for his one-piece carvings and his impeccable attention to detail. His carvings possess a fluid quality which makes the figure appear to be in motion. And his paint work is second to none. This carving, along with dozens of others, can be found on our website. A link is in the profile. The Angwusnasomtaka, or Crow Mother, as she is called, "is a figure of great dignity. She appears on all three mesas, usually in connection with the initiation of the children, although she also appears on other occassions. At the initiation rites she descends into the kiva bearing a large number of yucca blades bound together at the base. She takes a position at one corner of the large sand painting on the floor of the kiva, with one of her "sons" on either side of her. As the candidate is brought to the sand painting she hands a whip to one of the Hu' Kachinas who gives the child four healthy strokes with the yucca blade. When the yucca becomes worn it is handed back to the Crow Mother who then supplies a new one. When the initiatory whipping is over, she raises her skirts and receives the same treatment accorded the children. They are given prayer feathers and meal and leave the kiva." - Barton Wright, Kachinas: a Hopi Artist's Documentary (66)

Desert Dwellers

Desert Dwellers

Eric Lewis
Pueblo Pottery
6.75 x 6.75 inches (L x W)
this dazzling piece of pottery is the work of Eric Lewis of Acoma. It measures approximately 6.75” tall by 6.75” in diameter. Eric is a son of noted potter Sharon Lewis, also of Acoma Pueblo. He has taken classic Acoma designs and simplified their patterns to use in a black-on-white style which has a very modern appearance. He possess the rare skill of an accomplished potter along with the innovative vision of a young contemporary. His unique work stands out in terms of both design and execution. You can see this piece and many others on our website. Link in our profile. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Dragonfly Acrylic on Clay by Glendora Fragua

Dragonfly Acrylic on Clay by Glendora Fragua

Glendora Fragua
Pueblo Pottery
5.75 x 3 inches (L x W)
This beautiful piece features gold and copper detail along with coral accents. Glendora has painstakingly carved and painted nearly the entire surface of the vessel. The colors are so rich and warm. It just sings. Glendora Fragua is a member of the Corn Clan from the Jemez Pueblo. She was born in September of 1958. She began the art of working with natural clays and slips in 1976. She is the daughter of well known Jemez potter Juanita Fragua and her siblings are potter BJ Fragua and sculptor Clifford Fragua. She was taught all the fundamentals of constructing pottery vessels the ancient traditional way of hand coiling, pinching, and firing outdoors by members of the Jemez Pueblo which have been passed down from generation to generation.

Dragonfly Water Jar & Whiteware Rain Clouds

Dragonfly Water Jar & Whiteware Rain Clouds

Gloria Mahle
Pueblo Pottery
6.75 x 5.75 inches (L x W)
These are both by Gloria Mahle (Hopi). Her rich reds and highly polished surfaces have become her trademark - like this water jar on the left featuring raised appliqué dragonflies all around. The seed pot on the right is Gloria’s very first whiteware piece. We think it turned out exceptionally well and find the bold graphics provide a nice contrast.
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Eagle Guardian

Eagle Guardian

Tom Polacca
Pueblo Pottery
10.5 x 11 inches (L x W)
I purchased this incredible piece of Hopi pottery from Tom Polacca (circa 1996) for my father who was enamored with the art, the same way I was, as soon as he was exposed to it for the very first time. Tom called this piece “Grand Guardian” not only for the Eagle Dancer with his outstretched wings, but also for the Dawa Sunface which appears on the back. The sun is the source of light and life and is symbolic of God, our Father - the Creator and Guardian of us all. What makes this piece even more appropriate on this Father’s Day is the fact that its creator was something of a father figure to me - as a young man, inexperienced and naïve, and maybe even with a bit of “a chip on his shoulder,” as Tom used to tease. I was a quick learner however, and in true Hopi form, I would always reply, “if there’s a chip - it must be a chip off the old block!” We always had a good chuckle together. Tom passed in 2003, and I lost a dear friend and mentor. The family asked me to write and deliver the eulogy at his funeral. It was one of the great honors of my life and career. We were fortunate to collect a few special pieces created by Tom over the years, but this one was especially meaningful to my father and was “off limits” - meaning not for sale - until after his passing when my mother decided it was probably time to let someone else enjoy it the way they did for more than 20 years. It’s a special piece with a heritage all of its own, and I’m pleased to share it here with you in honor of my own father, as well as my Hopi one. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Eye Dazzler Seed Pot and Flute Neck Vase

Eye Dazzler Seed Pot and Flute Neck Vase

Robert Patricio
Pueblo Pottery
Recently acquired these two pieces from Robert Patricio of Acoma. Robert has long been a favorite of ours. He’s a hard working family man with a rare talent. When he’s not busy creating incredible pottery, he’s taking care of his family or traveling to a show. These measure 4.5” H x 5” D and 6” H x 5” D - left to right. Both are unique and distinct. You can read more about Robert and see more of his work on our website. Link is in our profile.

Figurative Fighting Fox and Blossom Pot

Figurative Fighting Fox and Blossom Pot

Lisa Holt & Harlan Reano
Pueblo Pottery
Check out this amazing figurative fox by Lisa Holt & Harlan Reano. This piece measures 14.75” tall by 9” wide and approximately 7.75” in diameter. Another stunning work of art by Lisa Holt and Harlan Reano. Check out the warm tone of the clay on this jar! It measures 7.5” tall and 6.5” in diameter. These guys have been on a roll lately and we are so excited to have these new pieces. Lisa is from Cochiti Pueblo. She is the granddaughter of potter Seferina Ortiz (1931-2007), who was her mentor. She also learned from her mother, Juanita Inez Ortiz, and her uncle, Virgil Ortiz. Harlan is from the Kewa Pueblo (formally known as Santo Domingo) He also has learned potting from his mother-in-law, Juanita Inez Ortiz. Together they continue to innovate and explore new themes in Pueblo pottery. They have won numerous awards and are featured in many important collections. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Fire & Ice

Fire & Ice

Thomas Tenorio
Pueblo Pottery
13.5 x 11.5 inches (L x W)
Thomas Tenorio was given the Indian name of “U-Nah-Thee-Wah” when he was born into the Pueblo of Santo Domingo in 1963. Thomas now has been making pottery for more than a decade. Thomas felt that the ancient traditional methods of pottery making was dying within his Pueblo, so he was inspired to try and resurrect this long lived legacy. Thomas taught himself how to make traditional pottery by reading textbooks, conducting one on one interviews with other pottery makers, research, and by trial and error. Thomas now teaches classes on pottery making so that anyone wanting to learn the art of working with clay can do so and carry on a long lived tradition. He gathers all of his natural pigments from within the Santo Domingo Pueblo. He cleans, hand mixes, hand coils, shapes, and fires his pottery outdoors, the traditional way, or he will fire his pottery in a kiln. Thomas has invented his own unique contemporary style. He adds a contemporary flare of cut-outs and new colors to the traditional Santo Domingo style. He makes a wide variety of shapes and sizes and he also paints birds and traditional designs with natural pigments found within his Pueblo. He signs his pottery as: Thomas Tenorio, Santo Domingo Pueblo. Available on our website. Link is in our profile. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Flute Neck Vase with Red Rim

Flute Neck Vase with Red Rim

Debbie Clashin
Pueblo Pottery
5 x 6 inches (L x W)
This beautiful flute-neck seed pot was made by Deb Clashin. She is related to Dianna Tahbo, Mark Tahbo, and Dorothy Ami. She learned the art of pottery making from her cousin, Diana. She has take first place in a handful of juried competitions throughout the Southwest for her clean and distinct classic Hopi pottery. Many of her designs feature birds or bird feathers, such as this piece. It measures approximately 5” tall by 6” in diameter. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Germination Vase

Germination Vase

Lisa Holt & Harlan Reano
Pueblo Pottery
7.75 x 6.75 inches (L x W)
More new work by Lisa Holt (Cochiti) and Harlan Reano (Santo Domingo). Classic black and white with orange dots using traditional Cochiti methods and materials featuring floral/germination designs throughout. This piece measures 7 3/4” H x 6 3/4” in diameter. It has not yet appeared on our website but is available now. Please message me directly for details. Lisa is is the granddaughter of potter Seferina Ortiz (1931-2007), who was her mentor. She also learned from her mother, Juanita Inez Ortiz, and her uncle, Virgil Ortiz. Harlan is from the Kewa Pueblo (formally known as Santo Domingo) He also has learned potting from his mother-in-law, Juanita Inez Ortiz. Together they continue to innovate and explore new themes in Pueblo pottery. They have won numerous awards and are featured in many important collections. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Grand Zia Bird Olla

Grand Zia Bird Olla

Marcellus & Elizabeth Medina
Pueblo Pottery
15 x 14 inches (L x W)
Here’s one by Marcellus & Elizabeth Medina (Zia) we have been waiting for! It measures a whopping 15" tall by 14" in diameter. It features an astonishing 82 birds! 2 hummingbirds and 2 butterflies along with 67 birds, 11 birds pregnant. This one is a showstopper! Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Grand Zuni Water Olla

Grand Zuni Water Olla

Joseph Latoma
Pueblo Pottery
14 x 16 inches (L x W)
Another fantastic water olla by Joseph Latoma. This piece measures 14” tall by 16” in diameter. The black on white provides such stark contrast for his bold designs and crisp details. His work is currently part of an ongoing exhibit at the School for Advanced Research in Santa Fe. Joseph is a member of the Corn/Water Clan and the son of Joe Latoma. His father is from Zuni Pueblo, thus, his Zuni name. His mother is Margaret Chavez of San Felipe Pueblo, providing his matriarchal link to San Felipe. In addition to silversmithing, he has been potting for twenty-three years. He spent his first eight years doing research, interviewing elders, and experimenting through trial and error. Because there is little documented historic pottery from San Felipe, Joseph has created his designs based on the memories of Pueblo elders from both San Felipe and Zuni. He is self-taught and began experimenting with local clay at the same time he became interested in researching his Pueblo’s traditional pottery styles in 1989. He is very interested in reintroducing traditional San Felipe pottery to both the Pueblo and a wider public. Joseph specializes in polychrome ollas, replicating artifacts through a hand-coiling technique. He has taught his wife, Nona, and their children, Dustin, Jaylene, Dalon, Janalyn, and Damon, to make pottery. He explains that this is the best way to teach children about their culture and traditions. The imagery on each pot has a story behind it. He does not put just any type of art on the pottery. The design on each piece is determined by the style of the pottery. Joseph says, “I make pottery to keep San Felipe traditions alive. It’s important to me that people know that San Felipe pottery exists.”

Hawk Sun Mask

Hawk Sun Mask

Gary Rice
Northwest Coastal Carving
21 x 21 x 7.5 inches (L x W x D)
Gary Rice - Hawk Sun. (21" H x 21" W x 7 1/2" D) Available on our website. See link above. Gary Rice was born June 30, 1939 in a fishing village in Rivers Inlet on the central coast of British Columbia. Mr. Rice is a member of the Coast Salish Nation. He was raised as a commercial fisherman and logger. After injuries forced him to give up manual labor in the mid 1970s, he began to seriously investigate the traditional arts of his native heritage and wood carving has been his occupation ever since. He finds satisfaction in carrying on the traditions of his ancestors and is a patient and dedicated carver. Gary is adept at various forms including screens, masks, bowls, paddles, and totem poles. Sun, to the people of the Northwest Coast, is a symbol of life. It is not an extremely common crest, except amongst the Kwakwaka’wakw. Sun is depicted within the art as a circle with protruding rays. It is commonly depicted as masculine; however, sun is occasionally displayed as female.

He Dances to the Songs of the Buffalo

He Dances to the Songs of the Buffalo

Hyrum Joe
Original Oil
36 x 36 inches (L x W)
This painting by Hyrum Joe is titled “He Dances to the Songs of the Buffalo.” It measures 30” x 30” (36” x 36” framed). Special price available upon request. Please inquire by calling 1.800.854.1359 or by sending us a direct message. This piece was inspired after encountering this impressive looking individual at a pow wow in Colorado several years ago. His heritage is Blackfoot and Shoshone. His regalia was the finest of all the dancers. He told Hyrum he had been dancing since he was basically a toddler and keeping the tradition alive. Hyrum was particularly impressed with the dancer’s Buffalo style split-horn headdress, and was obliged to paint this portrait. A series of one dozen paintings and drawings by Hyrum Joe is currently being showcased through the gallery right now. Please feel free to contact us with your comments and questions.

Heartline Deer - Acoma Olla

Heartline Deer - Acoma Olla

Joseph Cerno Jr.
Pueblo Pottery
10 x 13.5 inches (L x W)
Incredible Acoma Olla by Joseph Cerno, Jr. Measures approximately 10” tall by 13 1/2” in diameter. Born in 1972, Joseph Cerno Jr. is the son of Barbara and Joe Cerno, Sr. of Acoma Pueblo. Joseph learned the art of pottery making from his grandmother, Santana Cimmeron Cerno, and his father, Joseph Cerno, Sr. Joseph Jr. is an outstanding potter and painter of pottery as well. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details. Or visit our website: www.ancientnations.com

Hopi Coil Baskets & Plaques

Hopi Coil Baskets & Plaques

Various Artists
Hopi Basket
Hopi coil baskets are some of the most highly prized traditional art forms. Increasingly rare, they are coveted among members of the tribe, and used as a form of currency at weddings, and other ceremonies, as paybacks. Weavers at Second Mesa are the keepers of this tradition and have become incredibly skilled masters of their craft - elevating this once rudimentary practice into a fine art form of its own. Made from naturally dyed yucca fibers, wrapped around other plant material, these intricate creations can take months to complete. Harvesting the materials, preparing the dyes, calculating the design, and executing the finished product is a painstaking process that requires knowledge, skill, and experience. This particular piece is a three dimensional basket, differing from the flat coil plaques which are usually the norm. These pieces are even more difficult to create, especially with complex designs like the many different kachina faces appearing around the surface of this one. You can learn more about Hopi baskets and view several we have available for purchase by visiting our website. A link is in our profile. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

In the Woodland Garden - Iroquois Cradleboard

In the Woodland Garden - Iroquois Cradleboard

Babe Hemlock
Eastern Woodland Art Object
32 x 15 inches (L x W)
This Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) cradleboard was made by Babe Hemlock. It measures 32” long and 15” wide at the widest point as it tapers. In the traditional manner, Babe crafts these elaborate and functional cradleboards by hand. His images are taken from his Woodland heritage. As a member of the Kahnawake, Mohawk tribe - which is part of the Iroquois confederacy, Babe grew up playing outdoors and working with his hands. Like many of his peers he is an acomplished steel worker, but working with wood allows him to portray a softer, more colorful side of life as a traditional Mohawk. These boards are all cut and adorned by Babe, and each canopy is carefully hand turned and hand bent after much preparation. His decorative panels tell a story about life in the region where he grew up. Each is engraved, with the mural painted upon the relief carved surface. Babe worked High Steel in New York since he was 18. Always did artwork as a hobby. Cradleboards were done when someone in the community would come by and request one for their new baby. Only started to concentrate seriously on artwork for the past five years. Before starting a cradleboard design, Babe will sketch an idea out onto his drawing book. The process for the construction of the board itself is fashioned in the old Mohawk traditional style. Once the board is done, he will draw freestyle then carve the design by hand. Type of wood: pine is backboard and footboard, ash is the rowbar, maple is the backbar or a similar type of hardwood. Bound with catgut. Leather is deerhide and fur is different types. Whatever is available at the time: rabbit, beaver, etc. There are two different designs that he will incorporate onto the cradleboards. The traditional style will include our floral and bird designs. These are all on our oldest boards that we have seen. The contemporary style will incorporate the old style, but will also reflect the clans that are within our society. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Kiva Wing Vase and Zia Sunbird Jar

Kiva Wing Vase and Zia Sunbird Jar

Tonita Nampeyo
Pueblo Pottery
Zia Sunbird jar by Elizabeth Medina measures approximately 6” tall by 6” in diameter. Kiva Wing Vase by Tonita Nampeyo measures 13 1/2” tall by 12 1/2” in diameter. Exceptional examples of each of the respective artists work.

Koyemsi / Mudhead Kachina

Koyemsi / Mudhead Kachina

Malcolm Fred
Hopi Kachina
12.25 x 3.75 inches (L x W)
Mudhead (Koyemsi) by Malcolm Fred. Measures 12.5” total height. Available on our website. Link in profile. Malcolm comes from a large family of Kachina carvers which include brothers Jim, Verlan, Henry, Nathan and Glen. He has been carving and winning awards since he was a teenager. Malcolm is of the Greasewood and Roadrunner clans, and was raised in the village of Bacavi. He has been carving for 25 years. His motivation comes from his religion, history, and the freedom of expressing his inner feelings. Malcolm continues to achieve incredible realism in his figures, and is known for his large and well-proportioned figures. "Koyemsi or Mud-head Kachinas are probably the most well known of all the Hopi kachinas. They appear in almost every Hopi ceremony as clowns, interocutors, announcers of dances, drummers, and many other roles. "The nearly always accompany other kachinas; probably the only time when they do not appear with other personages is during the Night Dances. "Koyemsi are usually the ones that play games with the audiences to the accompaniment of rollicking tunes. These games are generally guessing games, or simple attempts to balance objects or performances of some common act. They most closely resemble our parlor games and the rewards are prizes of food or clothing." - Barton Wright, Kachinas: a Hopi Artist's Documentary (238)

Left-handed Hunter Kachina

Left-handed Hunter Kachina

Various Artists
Hopi Kachina
12 x 2.75 inches (L x W)
We love this Left-handed hunter kachina. It blends the best of both worlds together in terms of old-style carvings, with their natural characteristics, and contemporary carvings with their full relief detail. From the rabbit in his one hand and the hunting stick in the other, to the curvature of the cottonwood that makes up this piece, there are so many things to appreciate about this carving. It measures approximately 12" total height. You can see more Hopi kachinas and learn about the Left-handed Hunter, as well as many others, on our website. A link is in our profile. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Lightning Zig Zag

Lightning Zig Zag

Frederica Antonio
Pueblo Pottery
6.5 x 7 inches (L x W)
Frederica Antonio was born in 1968 into the Acoma Pueblo. Frederica was inspired to continue the long lived family tradition of making pottery by her mother-in-law, Mildred Antonio. Frederica developed an interest in pottery making while observing Mildred hand-coil and paint on her pottery. Mildred taught Frederica all the fundamentals of pottery making. Frederica began making pottery at the age of 18. Frederica specializes in contemporary hand coiled pottery with hand painted intricate eye dazzling designs. She fashions a brush from the stems of a yucca plant to paint her eye dazzling designs. She also paints a band on the side of her pottery with kokopelli (god of fertility). She also paints using different colors of paint so the pottery gives you a unique three dimensional effect. She hand coils a variety of sizes and styles, every one of her pots is a one of a kind work of art; there are no two pieces alike. She signs her masterpieces as: F.V. Antonio, Acoma, N.M. Frederica is also related to Melissa Antonio (cousin). Available on our website. Link is in our profile. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Low Shoulder Eagle Tails

Low Shoulder Eagle Tails

Gloria Mahle
Pueblo Pottery
4.75 x 9.25 inches (L x W)
This beautiful low-shoulder seed pot is the work of Gloria Mahle (Hopi-Tewa). Measures approximately 4 3/4” tall by 9 1/4” in diameter. Gloria’s painting is very fine and her polishing extremely smooth. Her finished pots are exceptional in quality and design. She is known for her bird, rain and cloud designs - as well as the rich, warm blush achieved through traditional firing techniques. Call 1.800.854.1359 or message us for details. You can also visit our website for more info: www.ancientnations.com

Mastop Kachina

Mastop Kachina

David Jensen
Hopi Kachina
11 x 3 inches (L x W)
This Mastop kachina is the work of David Jensen. It measures 11” total height (including a 2.75” base). More photos of this piece, along with additional information about the artist can be found on our website where we have dozens of top shelf kachina carvings - both traditional and contemporary. Link in our profile. “The Mastop kachina is the second kachina to appear on Third Mesa. He is not present on Second or First Mesa. These kachinas always arrive in pairs and come bounding out of the northwest on the next to last day of Soyal. "As they rush into the village they beat all the dogs that they encounter using the short black and white staff which they carry for that purpose. Leaping about with many antic gestures, they make their way to the Chief Kiva where they talk in disguised voices with the individuals inside and with each other. "Then, as though suddenly becoming aware of the females in the audience, they dash madly into a cluster of women and grab their shoulders from behind and they give a series of small hops indicating copulation. "Then they return to the kiva and converse for a while before again dashing over to another group of women, repeating the action until nearly every woman present from child to the very oldest has been approached. All women, even the shy ones, do not avoid this embrace as it is a serious fertility rite despite the antic touches, which are never directed toward the women." - Barton Wright, Kachinas: a Hopi Artist Documentary (13)

Messenger to the Navajo People

Messenger to the Navajo People

Hyrum Joe
Original Oil
12 x 24 inches (L x W)
Canvas measures 12” x 24” (framed 19.5” x 32”). Hyrum provides the following statement: “In my fondest of memories as a child growing up in Shiprock, NM, probably as an 8 yr old, I remember sitting on the back of my father's motorcycle as he and a few other friends of his chased bald eagles around Tsé Bit'a'í (Shiprock). Many stories were told of how the Eagle was the most powerful of all birds, and that they served as messengers from the Great Spirit to the Navajo people. Here, a Bald Eagle called, ‘Atsá,’ carries a medicine bag with corn pollen in it soars above Shiprock, carrying blessings to the Navajo people.“ Available on our website. Link in our profile. Call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Mixed Mica Box Pot

Mixed Mica Box Pot

Dominique Toya
Pueblo Pottery
4 x 3.25 inches (L x W)
This spectacular piece is the innovative creation of award-winning artist, Dominique Toya from the Jemez Pueblo. With a “box” design and alternating high-polish surface, this piece features the dazzling mica ribs Dominique’s work has become known for. Measures approximately 4” tall by 3 1/4” wide. Message usfor details or visit our website for more info: www.ancientnations.com. A link is in our profile.

Monsoon Clouds Over Shiprock

Monsoon Clouds Over Shiprock

Hyrum Joe
Original Oil
8 x 10 inches (L x W)
This quick study exemplifies Hyrum's dedication to perfecting his landscapes and capturing the soul of the land. These settings are instrumental in communicating time and place especially within the cultural context of Hyrum's diverse Native background. Specifically, this landmarks is an important sacred place for the Navajo people - as well as many other who have made the Southwest their home over the ages. This piece is available on our website. Call direct with questions. 1.800.854.1359

Mule Deer & Bighorn Sheep - Santa Clara Sienna Sgraffito

Mule Deer & Bighorn Sheep - Santa Clara Sienna Sgraffito

Kevin Naranjo
Pueblo Pottery
These exquisite miniatures are the work of Kevin Naranjo from Santa Clara pueblo. Kevin is a master of sgraffito pottery where the designs are meticulously etched into the surface of the vessel. These two measure approximately 3 1/4” H x 3” D (on the left) and 2 1/2” H x 2 1/2” D (on the right).

Old Style Saviki

Old Style Saviki

Justice Tso
Hopi Kachina
15.5 x 4.5 inches (L x W)
This Saviki katsina by Justice Tso measures 15.5” total height. It is currently available on our website. A link is in our profile. "The name of this kachina often changes from mesa to mesa. As Teanau, one of the old ones of the Bakab (Reed) Clan at First Mesa, he appears during the March ceremonies, or during the Ankwati when the Water Serpent is carried down to the spring for certain rites. In this role Tcanau appears as four individuals who are guardians for the Palolokong. His role on Second Mesa is unknown, but on Third Mesa he again appears as a guardian. Under the name of Saviki he is one of the Bow Clan ancients and appears as a single individual with Tangik'china and tow Kokoshoya when the Salako comes in person during Ankwati. The snake that the kachina carries in his mouth is a bull snake, and generally there is a lizard above his eyes." - Barton Wright, Kachinas: a Hopi Artist Documentary, (96) Justice entered his first juried competition as an adult in 2013 at the Museum of Northern Arizona’s annual Hopi Show and was awarded the director's award. He stated: "For me, coming to this festival is a way for me to get my name out," Tso said, "because I'd like to keep carving." Tso is from Sipaulovi on Second Mesa. He works at a shop selling Hopi gifts and art. Tso feels his connection to the art goes beyond aesthetics. "My father taught me to carve," Tso said, "and the first thing he taught me was that you can't just take from the religion, you have to give back, too." Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Ready for an Afternoon Ride - Canyon DeChelly

Ready for an Afternoon Ride - Canyon DeChelly

Hyrum Joe
Original Oil
20 x 16 inches (L x W)
Brand new work by Hyrum Joe #available now. Oil on canvas. (20” x 16”) Please inquire directly for more information. In the artist’s own words: “Brand spanking new painting done. Painting those rocks was super challenging, man were they tough, but I think I feel good about the final look. I originally intended this to be just a landscape...nope! I couldn't do it, I HAD to put in the cute older couple headed out for an afternoon ride in the canyon. Applying the bigger and looser brush strokes in the clouds and grass and dirt in the foreground were my forte. Tedious details aren't my favorite but I knew that if I could capture the personality of the Navajo man and woman with a good landscape, I know the painting would work harmonically. I subconsciously always take you through a bit of my journey painting when I do these write ups, I don't really intend to!” “It's a gorgeous day out in Canyon De Chelly and the man looks out onto the trail they'll take. He knows he and his beloved wife have only a handful of years together on this Earth, so he's going to make as many memories as he can with her. Their sheep dog will stay and watch the sheep in the corral. It’s called ‘Ready for an Afternoon Ride’ - At Canyon De Chelly.”

Red Carved Serpent by Clarissa Tafoya & Sgraffito Deer by Dean Haungooah

Red Carved Serpent by Clarissa Tafoya & Sgraffito Deer by Dean Haungooah

Various Artists
Pueblo Pottery
Whether you love deep carved reds or sgraffito etched black; whether you love work rooted deeply in cultural heritage or pushing the envelope of the most contemporary interpretations of tradition; pottery artists of the Santa Clara Pueblo have been mastering their craft for generations and delighting collectors in every camp with new and unique renditions. These two examples are by Clarissa Tafoya (L) and Dean Haungooah (R). The redware piece measures 8.5” tall by 4” in diameter. The sgraffito seed pot measures 3.25” tall by 3” in diameter. You can see these items and learn more about the respective artists on our website, or message me directly for details. Link in our profile. Please call 1.800.854.1359 for details.

Red Mica Ripples by Dominique Toya & Midnight Flyers by Harrison Begay Jr.

Red Mica Ripples by Dominique Toya & Midnight Flyers by Harrison Begay Jr.

Various Artists
Pueblo Pottery
This red and black pair of pottery was made by Dominique Toya (Jemez) and Harrison Begay Jr. (Diné), respectively. The red piece features an incredibly high polished sheen, along with Dominique’s trademark mica rib design appearing almost like rippling water around the opening. It measures approximately 3 3/4” tall by 5 1/2” in diameter. The black jar depicts two eagles in flight - one soaring high above the clouds and the other with talons outstretched as he makes his approach. Harrison is also an expert at achieving a high polished finish which he masterfully contrasts against an alternating matte background and other designs. It measures approximately 6” tall by 5 1/4” in diameter. Both available on our website. Link is in our profile. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Red and Black - San Ildefonso Contemporary

Red and Black - San Ildefonso Contemporary

Erik Fender
Pueblo Pottery
Check out this incredible duo of new pots by Erik Fender! The black jar features a knifewing design around the entire perimeter, accented by a copper band set off with heishi shell trim both above and below. It measures 7” tall by 6” in diameter. The red vessel also incorporates the knifewing design, alternating with classic San Ildefonso Pueblo geometrics. A bold white slip accents this piece, providing eye dazzling contrast. It measures 5.5" H x 4.5" D. Please message me directly for details or call 1.800.854.1359 for more information.

Redware Jar with Mare

Redware Jar with Mare

Jeff Roller
Pueblo Pottery
8 x 6 inches (L x W)
I’ve been a big fan of Jeff Roller’s work for a long time. This is the first piece we’ve had the opportunity to present. It features Jeff’s classic highly polished Santa Clara deep carved redware along with his trademark figurative lid. This piece showcases a lifelike mare astride the top of this gorgeous vase. It measures 8” total height by 6” in diameter. Available now. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Sacred Ground - Jemez Seed Pot

Sacred Ground - Jemez Seed Pot

Aaron Cajero
Pueblo Pottery
4 x 3.75 inches (L x W)
This exquisite little gem is by Aaron Cajero of Jemez Pueblo. It measures 4” tall and 3.75” in diameter. Currently available. Aaron Cajero was born in 1966 into the Jemez Pueblo. Aaron is a member of the Fire Clan. He began working with clay art in 1993. He learned the traditional way of hand coiling pottery using ancient methods from the members of his family. They taught him all the fundamentals of working with clay artforms. See this piece, and learn more about the artist on our website. A link is in our profile. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.
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Santo Domingo Vase by Ambrose Atencio. Red Rib Jar by Anna Archuleta.

Santo Domingo Vase by Ambrose Atencio. Red Rib Jar by Anna Archuleta.

Ambrose Atencio
Pueblo Pottery
This dynamic duo is the work of Ambrose Atencio (Santo Domingo) on the left, and Anna Archuleta (Santa Clara) on the right. Both are impeccable examples of their respective styles, incorporating methods and materials unique to their own indigenous culture. The opaque vase on the left measures approximately 9” tall by 8 1/2” in diameter. The red ribbed jar on the right measures approximately 5 3/4” tall by 5 1/4” in diameter. Message me for details or visit our website for more information: www.ancientnations.com. A link is in our profile.

Saturday at the Flea Market

Saturday at the Flea Market

Hyrum Joe
Original Oil
25 x 21 inches (L x W)
This oil painting by Hyrum Joe is titled “Saturday at the Flea Market.” It measures 16” x 20” (21" x 25" framed). Please inquire by calling 1.800.854.1359 or by messaging us directly. This piece captures the joyful innocence of two young friends at the Saturday morning flea market. It's easily among our favorite paintings by Hyrum. His ability to evoke emotion by working with light and shadows is well illustrated in this piece - and all the familiar details immerse the viewer into the cultures of his upbringing. You can almost feel the warmth of the sun, the velvet in her dress, and the leather in her moccasins. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details. This piece can also be seen on our website. A link is in our profile.

Sidewinder - Acoma Eyedazzler

Sidewinder - Acoma Eyedazzler

Paula Estevan
Pueblo Pottery
4 x 5.5 inches (L x W)
Brand New Sidewinder by Paula Estevan. So excited to acquire this piece for the gallery. Paula is an exceptional talent but also a wonderful person. This one measures 4” tall and 5.5” in diameter. Available now. Message me for more info. Or see more of her work on our website. A link is in our profile. Artist Bio: Paula (Estevan) Vallo is a third generation pottery artist from the Pueblo of Acoma. She specializs in contemporary handmade Acoma pottery using contemporary paints and brushes. I do work with traditional paints & brushes but only for ceremonial purposes. She was inspired by her great grandmother, aunts, mother, Patricia Estevan and a wonderful & amazing family friend. Each year her work seems to become more intricate and delicate in design and form. Paula is masterful at using simple designs to emphasize the shape of her pottery. It's hard to imagine where one could begin and how everything ends up so balanced and uniform. This is a hallmark of a truly talented potter. One of her specialties is a distinctive lightning pattern design of white, zig-zagged stripes against a black background. Just take a look at the dizzying detail in this gorgeous pot. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.
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Son of the Desert

Son of the Desert

Edward S. Curtis
Goldtone Photograph
17 x 14 inches (L x W)
This incredible goldtone, created by Christoper Cardozo, features an image by Edward S. Curtis. This piece is titled “Son of the Desert” and measures approximately 17” H x 14” W (image dimensions). It also features this classic batwing frame. You can see further details, along with pricing, on our website. A link is in our profile. Christopher Cardozo is widely acknowledged as the world’s leading authority on Edward S. Curtis. He is the author of nine monographs on Edward Curtis and has created and curated one-person Edward Curtis exhibitions that have been seen in nearly one hundred venues in over forty countries. Having collected Edward Curtis’ artwork for four decades, Cardozo has created the world’s largest and most broad-ranging Curtis collection. No one has done more to increase the awareness, understanding, and appreciation for Curtis’ work than Christopher Cardozo, except Edward Curtis himself. Cardozo reinvented the lost Goldtone process from the ground up, marrying the best of modern technology using Curtis’ exquisite negatives. Goal: to consistently produce stunning Goldtones as good as the top half percent of Edward Curtis’ vintage Goldtones. Cardozo spent over three years and nearly half a million dollars on research and development. Each framed and printed image is individually hand-created, together encompassing over 70 different steps. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Split Tail Swallow by Elizabeth Medina (Zia) & Swoop Neck Vase by Gloria Mahle (Hopi)

Split Tail Swallow by Elizabeth Medina (Zia) & Swoop Neck Vase by Gloria Mahle (Hopi)

Various Artists
Pueblo Pottery
A marvelous duo by Elizabeth Medina (Zia) featuring a Split-tail Swallow in flight on the left along side a “Swoop Neck” vase by Gloria Mahle (Hopi). Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Stone Polished Redware Olla by Joseph Latoma & Micaceous Vortex Seed Pot by Dominique Toya

Stone Polished Redware Olla by Joseph Latoma & Micaceous Vortex Seed Pot by Dominique Toya

Various Artists
Pueblo Pottery
Check out this dynamic duo. A gorgeous stone-polished redware olla by Joseph Latoma in the background, and a brand new micaceous seed pot by Dominique Toya in the foreground. Joseph‘s olla is so dramatic, and the stone-polished surface provides a striking contrast for the polychrome painting. It measures 9.5" H x 12" D. As for Dominique’s new piece - just try and count the number of ribs on this beauty! So tightly formed and perfectly executed. It’s a gem. It measures 5" H x 5.25" D. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Sunrise Ceremony - Mescalero Apache

Sunrise Ceremony - Mescalero Apache

Hyrum Joe
Original Oil
24 x 36 inches (L x W)
Another installment in our series by Native American oil painter extraordinaire - Hyrum Joe. This piece is titled “Sunrise Ceremony - Mescalero Apache.” It measures 24” H x 36” L unframed. Hyrum provided the following description: “The Mescalero Apache's Sunrise Ceremony is a four day, coming of age ceremony held in honor of a young girl soon after her first menstruation. A dancer here, blesses a young girl with soaked corncake covering a bundle of sage over her head, giving her the pureness of the corn in which signifies the staff of life or a gift to the Native People from the Great Spirit. Being invited to see the dances in person is a great honor and inspires me to learn more about my culture and use to my advantage in spiritual strength.” Available now on our website. Please inquire directly. A link is in our profile.

Tailfeather Vase

Tailfeather Vase

Paula Estevan
Pueblo Pottery
9.5 x 6.5 inches (L x W)
Another precision piece of Pueblo pottery by Paula Estevan from Acoma. This incredible vase measures 9 1/2” tall by 6 1/2” in diameter. Her specialty is traditional pottery with a distinctive lightning pattern design of black, zig-zagged stripes against a white background. Message usfor details or visit our website for more information: www.ancientnations.com. A link is in our profile.

Taos Water Girls

Taos Water Girls

Edward S. Curtis
Goldtone Photograph
17 x 14 inches (L x W)
This incredibly gorgeous goldtone was created by Christoper Cardozo, featuring an image by Edward S. Curtis. This piece is titled “Taos Water Girls” and measures approximately 17” H x 14” W (image dimensions). It also features this classic batwing frame. You can see further details, along with pricing, on our website. A link is in our profile. Christopher Cardozo is widely acknowledged as the world’s leading authority on Edward S. Curtis. He is the author of nine monographs on Edward Curtis and has created and curated one-person Edward Curtis exhibitions that have been seen in nearly one hundred venues in over forty countries. Having collected Edward Curtis’ artwork for four decades, Cardozo has created the world’s largest and most broad-ranging Curtis collection. No one has done more to increase the awareness, understanding, and appreciation for Curtis’ work than Christopher Cardozo, except Edward Curtis himself. Cardozo reinvented the lost Goldtone process from the ground up, marrying the best of modern technology using Curtis’ exquisite negatives. Goal: to consistently produce stunning Goldtones as good as the top half percent of Edward Curtis’ vintage Goldtones. Cardozo spent over three years and nearly half a million dollars on research and development. Each framed and printed image is individually hand-created, together encompassing over 70 different steps.

Thunderbird Wedding Vase - Circa 1975

Thunderbird Wedding Vase - Circa 1975

Fannie Nampeyo
Pueblo Pottery
9.25 x 6 inches (L x W)
Fannie was arguably the most well known of all Nampeyo’s daughters and was prolific in her production of the “migration” pattern pottery that had become synonymous with Hopi pottery - and Nampeyo in particular. She had two sisters - Annie Healing and Nellie Douma. All three sisters had children who carried on the family tradition. Fannie had seven children: Tom Polacca, Iris Youvella, Tonita Hamilton, Elva, Leah, Harold, and Ellsworth - each of which were pottery artists at some time in their lives. Their grandmother, Nampeyo, was a young woman, married to a man named Lesou, when she was encouraged by an ethnologist by the name of Jesse Walter Fewkes, and a trading post operator by the name of Thomas Keam (who was also the first Indian agent to the Hopi) to revitalize the ancient art form of decorative pottery making - which remnants were discovered first among the ruins of the nearby Sikyátki village. Subsequently, she has been credited with single-handedly reviving this once lost tradition.

Traditional Ceremonial Bowl by Fannie Nampeyo

Traditional Ceremonial Bowl by Fannie Nampeyo

Fannie Nampeyo
Pueblo Pottery
2.25 x 4.25 inches (L x W)
Great little ceremonial bowl by Fannie Nampeyo. Measures 2.25” tall and 4.25” in diameter. Loving the warm tones that Hopi pottery is known for. Fannie was a daughter of the original Nampeyo and was instrumental in keeping the tradition alive, not only by producing her own impressive and important works, but by passing the legacy on to her heirs - most of which have gone on to become accomplished potters in their own right. There are literally volumes dedicated to the history of Nampeyo and her descendants. Happy to answer any questions. This piece is currently available. Message me for details.

Traditional Hopi Katsina Dolls

Traditional Hopi Katsina Dolls

Various Artists
Hopi Kachina
10 x 3.5 inches (L x W)
Traditional Hopi katsina dolls - sometimes referred to as “old style” - have made a massive resurgence as a fine art form. Carvers today are known for their meticulous attention to detail and for hand fashioning even the smallest accouterments. In the Hopi culture, these dolls are given to young boys and girls during various dances and ceremonies in order to acquaint them with the spirit beings who govern over life on earth. They are hung prominently in Hopi homes and remain there as prized possessions. These figures were created by different artists and depict a Koyemsi (or Mudhead) and a Pokonghoya. These items are available on our website now. Please message me for more info, visit our site, or call 1.800.854.1359.

Traditional Hopi Polychrome Pottery with Sikyatki Eagle Motifs

Traditional Hopi Polychrome Pottery with Sikyatki Eagle Motifs

Debbie Clashin
Pueblo Pottery
Two new works by Debbie Clashin (Hopi). Classic Sikyatki eagle tail motifs on both. Check out those warm fire clouds! These are pristine examples of one of the most increasingly recognized potters at Hopi today. Left rear measures 6.5” tall and 8.5” in diameter. Right front measures 5.5” tall and 6.5” in diameter. Deb is related to Dianna Tahbo, Mark Tahbo, and Dorothy Ami. She learned the art of pottery making from her cousin, Diana. She has take first place in a handful of juried competitions throughout the Southwest for her clean and distinct classic Hopi pottery. Many of her designs feature birds or bird feathers, such as these two. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Trek to Turtle Island - Beadwork Tapestry

Trek to Turtle Island - Beadwork Tapestry

Molly Murphy
Plains Indian Beadwork
29 x 17 inches (L x W)
This beaded wall hanging is the creation of award winning artist, Molly Murphy Adams. It measures 29” long and 17” wide. It is composed of hand dyed wool, Czech size 13, 15 and 18 beads, velvet ribbon, crystal beads, Czech trim beads, bone beads, canvas backing, and nylon thread. This image is an amalgamation of several myths, all related to a first woman and her child and their journey to to Turtle Island. The wall hanging depicts a mother, child and horse walking through a mountain lanscape. The sky displays in a mountain pattern with swallows flying. The mother is leading her horse with the childs cradle board hanging from the saddle. Behind the saddle blanket dangles a fringed parfleche pouch. Below the figures is an arch of beadwork similar to the beadwork on the front of womens dresses. This shape and pattern on womens dresses represents the power and protection of the turtles. All the elements of the composition relate a landscape rich with myth. Many origination stories begin with a human mother married to a star person. After digging a forbidden root, she became too homesick and returned to earth (or fell, depending on the story) from her home among the stars. She and her child were saved from the ocean by turtle, who with the help of other sacred animals and plants, found land where she could raise her son. Many myths compare the earth to a turtle that literally supports and protects the landscape and all living things upon it. See this piece along with other beadwork items and learn more about Molly by visiting our website. A link is in our profile. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Trio of Eyedazzlers by Paula Estevan

Trio of Eyedazzlers by Paula Estevan

Paula Estevan
Pueblo Pottery
A trio of black and white eyedazzlers by Paula Estevan from Acoma Pueblo. She began making pottery around 1986. Each year the work seems to become more intricate and delicate in design and form. Paula is masterful at using simple designs to emphasize the shape of her pottery. Each piece is very thin-walled and coil built. They are painted with native clay slips and bee-weed. These measure between 4 3/4” tall and 6 1/2” in diameter. Message me for details or visit our website: www.ancientnations.com. A link is in our profile.

Trio of Hopi Pottery by Stetson Setalla

Trio of Hopi Pottery by Stetson Setalla

Stetson Setalla
Pueblo Pottery
Here’s a trio of new pieces by Stetson Setalla. These range from 5” to 7” tall and from 8.5” to 11.5” in diameter. These are some of the richest color and finest design work I’ve seen from Stetson in a long time. From Stetson's autobiographical statement: "Good thoughts and a good heart are essential in working with your clay because you are creating yourself in each pot as you coil and when you are ready to paint the pot, a clear mind and good heart is crucial in assisting you with your painting because the designs flow through your mind into your hand and onto your pot without difficulty.” Call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for more info.

Tumbling Birds by Rainy Naha

Tumbling Birds by Rainy Naha

Rainy Naha
Pueblo Pottery
9 x 4.5 inches (L x W)
Very happy to present this beautiful Tumbling Birds pottery by Rainy Naha (Tewa-Hopi). Clean and classic white, with her trademark array of soft color slips bring this piece to life. Rainy Naha was born in 1949 into the Spider/Stick clan as the daughter of Helen Naha (Feather Woman) and the grand-daughter of Paqua Naha (the original Frog Woman). Her siblings include Sylvia Naha Humpheries (d.) and Burell Naha. Of all Naha family decendents, Rainy is perhaps the most prolific in her perpetuation of the pottery tradition. Having won numerous awards, including blue ribbons at the prestigious Santa Fe Indian Market, the Eight Northern Indian Art Show, and the Annual Heard Museum Show, it is easy to see how such meticulous detail and innovative design has taken Rainy's work to the top.
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Water Serpent Wedding

Water Serpent Wedding

Lisa Holt & Harlan Reano
Pueblo Pottery
21 x 14.5 x 11.5 inches (L x W x D)
Whoa! This one just won’t wait! Check out the spectacular wedding vase by Lisa Holt & Harlan Reano! Measuring a whopping 21” H x 14.5” W x 11.5” D, this piece features the bold designs and contemporary innovative style this award-winning couple has become known for. Lisa is from Cochiti Pueblo. She is the granddaughter of potter Seferina Ortiz (1931-2007), who was her mentor. She also learned from her mother, Juanita Inez Ortiz, and her uncle, Virgil Ortiz. Harlan is from the Kewa Pueblo (formally known as Santo Domingo) He also has learned potting from his mother-in-law, Juanita Inez Ortiz. Together they continue to innovate and explore new themes in Pueblo pottery. They have won numerous awards and are featured in many important collections. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Zia Bird Jar

Zia Bird Jar

Elizabeth Medina
Pueblo Pottery
8.5 x 8.5 inches (L x W)
This solo jar features the classic Zia Sun on front and back, with a variety of birds on alternating panels throughout. Elizabeth Medina, “Sepia,” was born in 1956 into the Jemez Pueblo. She married into the Zia Pueblo and was inspired by her Mother-in-Law, Sofia Medina, to learn the art of working with clay. Elizabeth observed Sofia with much enthusiasm in hopes of achieving the same skills. She specializes in handmade traditional Zia pottery with traditional symbols and birds. She digs up her own clay, cleans, mixes, coils, shapes, fires, and paints her pottery the traditional way, with natural colors. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us directly for details.

Zia Blessings

Zia Blessings

Marcellus & Elizabeth Medina
Pueblo Pottery
9.5 x 6 inches (L x W)
This lidded jar is the work of Marcellus and Elizabeth Medina. It measures 9.5” tall and 6” in diameter. Marcellus is from Zia Pueblo. He was inspired to continue the family tradition of pottery making by his ancestors, the support of many people, creative inspiration, and economic motivation. Marcellus signs his pottery as: Medina, year, and accents it with a zia bird symbol, Marcellus is related to the following artists: Elizabeth Medina (spouse), Sofia Medina (mother), and Lois Medina (sister). He has won many awards including first place at Santa Fe Indian Market, and Best of Show at the New Mexico State Fair. Elizabeth Medina, “Sepia,” was born in 1956 into the Jemez Pueblo. She married into the Zia Pueblo and was inspired by her Mother-in-Law, Sofia Medina, to learn the art of working with clay. Elizabeth observed Sofia with much enthusiasm in hopes of achieving the same skills. She specializes in handmade traditional Zia pottery with traditional symbols and birds. She digs up her own clay, cleans, mixes, coils, shapes, fires, and paints her pottery the traditional way, with natural colors. Please call 1.800.854.1359 or message us for details. You can also visit our website for more info: www.ancientnations.com